NEW SCIENTIST

Computers that operate on the principles of quantum mechanics could massively speed up the discovery of solutions to certain problems, but scaling up lab experiments to machines that can solve real problems has so far proved too challenging.

Now Simon Devitt of the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in Saitama, Japan, and his colleagues want help from members of the public to change that.

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Phys.org – Michael Trupke

Assorted articles on several subjects.

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MIT Technology Review

Simon Devitt… has built an online game that has the potential to play a crucial role in the future of quantum programming.

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ABC Radio

Researchers around the globe believe the development of a functioning Quantum computer is now within reach. So what exactly would a quantum computer do and who would use it?

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Sydney Morning Herald

Next time someone tells you computer games are a waste of time, there’s now a better response than saying you’re improving hand-eye co-ordination. Just say you’re helping science.

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Slate

… the next time your boss yells at you for playing meQuanics on the clock, just tell her that you’re doing it for quantum computing research and the good of humanity.

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Phys.org

A new kind of quantum computer is being proposed by scientists from the TU Wien (Vienna) and Japan (National Institute of Informatics and NTT Basic Research Labs).

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Science Daily

The quantum computer is not yet quite around the corner: calculations show that to implement a useful quantum algorithm, billions of quantum systems have to be used. The elements of a newly proposed quantum computer concept, nitrogen atoms trapped in diamonds, could in principle be miniaturized and mass produced. This system could be to quantum computing what the transistor was for microelectronics.

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New Scientist

… Simon Devitt of Ochanomizu University in Tokyo and his colleagues say we can bypass the challenges of putting these repeaters on the seabed and still create a kind of international quantum internet. Instead, container ships loaded with quantum bits could cross the seas and connect distant servers.

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MIT Technology Review

The best way to build a global quantum internet will use containerships to carry qubits across the oceans, say physicists.

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Gizmodo

Our internet has a physical infrastructure: thousands of kilometres of cables that criss-cross the oceans. The quantum internet, when it exists, will have a physical infrastructure too. But you can’t send quantum bits, or “qubits”, on fibre optic cables, so a group of physicists has proposed a bizarre solution: cargo ships carrying data on diamond-based drives. And it’s not a completely whacky idea.

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